Radiometric dating a christian perspective

16-Jul-2015 10:29 by 7 Comments

Radiometric dating a christian perspective

So, a carbon atom might have six neutrons, or seven, or possibly eight—but it would always have six protons.An “isotope” is any of several different forms of an element, each having different numbers of neutrons.

These cosmic rays collide with atoms in the atmosphere and can cause them to come apart.The earth has a magnetic field around it which helps protect us from harmful radiation from outer space. The stronger the field is around the earth, the fewer the number of cosmic rays that are able to reach the atmosphere.This would result in a smaller production of The cause for the long term variation of the C-14 level is not known.The illustration below shows the three isotopes of carbon.Some isotopes of certain elements are unstable; they can spontaneously change into another kind of atom in a process called “radioactive decay.” Since this process presently happens at a known measured rate, scientists attempt to use it like a “clock” to tell how long ago a rock or fossil formed.For example, all carbon atoms have 6 protons, all atoms of nitrogen have 7 protons, and all oxygen atoms have 8 protons.

The number of neutrons in the nucleus can vary in any given type of atom.Genesis 1 defines the days of creation to be literal days (a number with the word “day” always means a normal day in the Old Testament, and the phrase “evening and morning” further defines the days as literal days).Since the Bible is the inspired Word of God, we should examine the validity of the standard interpretation of All radiometric dating methods use scientific procedures in the present to interpret what has happened in the past. Can carbon-14 dating help solve the mystery of which worldview is more accurate?There are two main applications for radiometric dating.One is for potentially dating fossils (once-living things) using carbon-14 dating, and the other is for dating rocks and the age of the earth using uranium, potassium and other radioactive atoms.Protons and neutrons make up the center (nucleus) of the atom, and electrons form shells around the nucleus.