Efffects of dating abuse and teens

26-Feb-2015 18:56 by 5 Comments

Efffects of dating abuse and teens

Interviews conducted with some of the Logoli tribe in Kenya suggested they feared polygynous marriages because of what they have witnessed in the lives of other women who are currently in such relationships.

These include sororal polygyny, in which the co-wives are sisters; and hut polygyny, in which each wife has her own residence and the husband visits them in rotation.

This implies that members of a tribe, which commands a certain territory, have a native right to take land under cultivation for food production and in many cases also for the cultivation of cash crops.

Under this tenure system, an additional wife is an economic asset that helps the family to expand its production.

) is the most common and accepted form of polygamy, entailing the marriage of a man with several women.

Most countries that permit polygamy are Muslim-majority countries in which polygyny is the only form permitted.

The status of a mistress is not that of a wife, and any children born of such relationships were and some still are considered illegitimate and subject to legal disadvantage.

Historically, polygyny was partly accepted in ancient Hebrew society, in classical China, and in sporadic traditional Native American, African and Polynesian cultures.

A man with a single wife has less help in cultivation and is likely to have little or no help for felling trees.

According to Boserup's historical data, women living in such a structure also welcome one or more co-wives to share with them the burden of daily labor.

This favoured polygamous marriages in which men sought to monopolize the production of women "who are valued both as workers and as child bearers." Goody, however, observes that the correlation is imperfect.

He also describes more male dominated though relatively extensive farming systems such as those that exist in much of West Africa, particularly the savannah region, where polygamy is desired more for the production of sons whose labor is valued." Goody's observation regarding African male farming systems is discussed and supported by anthropologists Douglas R. Burton in "Causes of Polygyny: Ecology, Economy, Kinship, and Warfare", where the authors note: "Goody (1973) argues against the female contributions hypothesis.

Anthropologist Jack Goody's comparative study of marriage around the world, using the Ethnographic Atlas, demonstrated a historical correlation between the practice of extensive shifting horticulture and polygyny in the majority of Sub-Saharan African societies.